Public Buildings

Wellesley Community Centre

Toronto, Canada

Located on a compact urban site, this $10 M multi-use facility includes a new community centre, public library and daycare, serving the residents of Canada’s highest density per capita neighbourhood.  The 50,000 s.f. facility has become the community’s focal point, organized to provide a high level of access to community programs and events.  Visual transparency from the street and within the building achieves dynamic results, such as the street-level windows of the gymnasium and the large corner window of the library.  The double-height central lobby provides centralized access to the gymnasium, public library, multi-purpose rooms and the second floor daycare facility, which is linked to a sheltered, roof-top exterior play area.  The building was also designed to accept a future leisure pool addition. (in joint venture with MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects)

Client

City of Toronto,
Toronto Public Library

Size

50,000 s.f.
2 Storey Facility
Child Care – 600 sqm
Child Care with Play Area – 6,500 s.f.
Elevated Exterior Play Area – 3,7000 s.f.
Library - 7,800 s.f.

Program

Public Library
Community Centre
Daycare
Gymnasium
Future Leisure Pool

Awards

  • Award of Excellence - OLA Building Awards
  • Finalist Award – National Post Design Exchange Awards
  • OAA Award for Architectural Excellence - Institutional A (Under $10M)
  • Toronto Architecture & Urban Design Awards Honourable Mention, Building in Context
  • Outside the Box Awards Merit Award, Urban Design Category

Articles

  • Wellesley Community Centre & St. James Town Public LibraryCanadian Architect Edition, Dec 2010
  • “Community Spirit” Azure Magazine, Jan/Feb 2005
  • “Wellesley Community Centre” Building Magazine, Aug/Sept 2005
  • “Civic Manners” Peter Sobchak, Building Magazine, Dec/Jan 2005
  • “Boundary Condition” Colin Ripley, Canadian Architect, Sept 2005
  • “The birth of Toronto Style” Lisa Rochon, Globe and Mail, Nov 2004
  • “St. James Town corner gets beauty on a budget” Christopher Hume, Oct 2004